Home

kateswaffer.com is committed to meaningful dialogue with a wide range of stakeholders about the critical issues impacting a person living with a diagnosis of dementia and their loved ones.

Opinions in this blog, if authored by me, are my own.

Note, I might also change my mind on a topic tomorrow, if I read something, or experience something that encourages me to do so.

Blogs authored by others, including research articles, do not indicate my agreement with them, merely my willingness to have other opinions here and provide a more diverse collection of articles and opinions.

Comments I have approved, also does not indicate my agreement with them.

I will not allow all opinions here, if they are especially vindictive, hurtful or are offensive, although have often approved some that are.

But, please realise they do hurt and upset me, often; but in an attempt to be fair to others, I still do approve many that have and continue to hurt my feelings.

Signing up to this site means you will receive the link to my daily blog straight into your email inbox. I will NEVER share or sell your information.

Please note: your entries may be modified, and any inappropriate entries will be deleted. The primary purpose of my blog is to recall my thoughts and activities, but I want it to remain informative, inspired, and above all, honourable. Finally, I want it to reach out to you.

No Medical Advice: Information and other content included on this Site is for general informational and educational purposes only and is not meant to be a substitute for the advice provided by a professional health care provider. You may not use or rely on any information contained on the Site for diagnosing a health or medical problem or disease. Comments made by others, and approved for posting on kateswaffer.com are opinions of the authors, and do not represent the opinions of Kate Swaffer. You should always consult a professional health care provider regarding any health or medical condition, prevention, or treatment. Do not delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice on account of something you have read on kateswaffer.com

Kate Swaffer © 2011/12/13/14/15 | All rights reserved. Subject to the Copyright Act 1968, no part of this online website may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form, or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, printed, recording or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the author.

105 thoughts on “Home

  1. Hello Kate,
    I was at the ADI conference in Perth a few weeks ago, and was most impressed and honoured and felt privileged to hear you speak and tell your story. Thank you so much for making me understand better what makes you tick and about challenges experienced as well as achievements recognised by being the first employee. Congratulations!!
    I was wanting to ask a favour: Firstly could I please use your poem in my UTAS essay when writing about Early Onset Alzheimer’s for Dementia Care Degree assignment, and secondly would you have access to any statistics or additional info I could use in regards to “Impact of EO on mainstream society”. (Or point me in right direction for info, please). Thank you so much Kate. Best wishes from Corry

    • Hi Corry… firstly, thanks for the generous feedback, and for joining the conversation here. What poem are you talking about? Also, FYI, Early Onset is now referred to as Younger Onset Dementia (YOD = under 65 years of age) as anyone can be in the early stages of a dementia.

      Regarding stats or information specific to YOD, I’m not sure I can direct you anywhere, other then hat usual sites such as Alzheimer’s Australia and Alzheimer’s Disease International. You can find some info at the following sites that will include current stats and infographic on dementia:
      ADI – http://www.alz.co.uk/research/G8-policy-brief go to the bottom of the page to download
      WHO – http://www.who.int/mental_health/neurology/dementia/infographic_dementia/en/

      At the WHO Ministerial Conference on Dementia, they stated there are over 47.5 million currently diagnosed with dementia, and ADI state there is a new diagnosis somewhere in the world every 4 seconds. I believe the Australian figure that is one every 6 minutes, but not 100% that is current.

      The figures in Australia are over 344,000 people diagnosed with dementia, with over 25,100 of those people with YOD, which were the stats given recently at a Parliamentary summit, but probably on their website as well.
      Anyway, hope this helps. Cheers, Kate

      • Hi Kate.
        Sorry to write this here.
        I hope you see this…
        I’m at a complete loss as to how to navigate in this page.
        How do I see your latest blog.
        I’m sorry I don’t know what to click on….
        Do I start by clicking “home” and then do something?
        Sorry…
        Steve…

      • No stress Steve… I have emailed you so hope that helps. But, in case you don’t get it, if you go to the section of the website with the heading, hit the page that says BLOG, then scroll down to the latest one (which is not at the top, just to make it more confusing!)…. or you can Follow it, by adding your email to the blue FOLLOW button on the right hand side of the page. hugs to you both xox

  2. Hi Kate,

    I just want to sincerely thank you for your efforts in writing your blog and encourage you in the incredible work that you are doing. You are shedding such light on this area and are an inspiration to many.

    I am in the beginning stages of implementing a new project – Recovery Approach to Dementia Care – in regional NSW, within a community setting. The Recovery Approach builds upon Person Centred Care and some of the core principles are inclusion and social access, redefining self outside of labels, strengths based, and fostering hope. This model has been used in the mental health setting for years. I believe that the health system in Australia can improve so much in relation to dementia care, both in policy and in practice. I hope that I too may be able to impact this positively as you are also doing – time will tell!

    Again thank you, you are helping to pave the way for the future care and support of many people living with dementia.

    Kind regards,
    Rachel.

Leave your thoughts, but please leave your judgement at the door... Thanks.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s