Sharing and caring

When our children are small, we constantly suggest they share their toys with their friends… we say or imply sharing is caring. My interpretation of the Maria Montessori method of teaching children through play was sharing should not be forced, but would happen naturally when the child felt safe and that they can trust the…

Richard Taylor

Dear Richard, You have been my shining beacon of light since my diagnosis of younger onset dementia. My Google and I were best friends for the first few weeks as I searched for information about dementia, and for help. Any form of help, as there seemed to be none out there, and I had not been…

‘LUCKY’ spelt as ‘HARD WORK’

Appearing as if you are LUCKY virtually always comes through effort and so I usually spell lucky like this: HARD WORK! I heard recently that I have been called lucky because the symptoms of my dementia do not seem to be progressing as quickly as the initial prognosis predicted, or as some others who’ve been diagnosed. This…

Is your glass half full or half empty?

In a tribute to a loved one living with a diagnosis of dementia somewhere on the beautiful site Moving Your Soul she said; “I couldn’t see the woman she really was, I could only see what I was missing in her. Now, I can see who she is, who she’s always been, a positive woman…

People with dementia as Advocates

There are many positive things happening globally about dementia. Research is making small headway, governments are at least starting to listen, the carers of people living with dementia have had a strong voice for some time, and now, very occasionally people with dementia are speaking out. Richard Taylor and Christine Bryden are two people I…

Talking about dementia

I started blogging to record my world. My blog now also tries to highlight the human and personal costs of a diagnosis of dementia, the significant financial impact to individuals and families, and responds to the current status of age appropriate resources and services, or lack thereof, for people diagnosed with younger onset dementia and…

I can’t find the chicken

Well, I did eventually find it… In the microwave; 3 or 4 days later when the stench took over the kitchen! This happened some time ago, and silly little things like this are happening to me every day now, much more often. Not monumentally catastrophic, but annoying and life changing just the same. Things that…

Ramblings of the demented

There is no rhyme or reason to my thinking today, other than finding a recipe for my Project 366 Conversations and Recipes Page. I can’t find any of my blog drafts, cleverly but mysteriously filed away somewhere on my laptop, and can’t think of anything interesting to write about so I’m doing a bit of NaNoWriMo…

Human Rights, dementia and the elderly

ALL Australians are meant to be protected by The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, a wonderful document one that took many years to design, and to get countries to agree to. However, it seems not to apply to the health and aged care system in Australia. When we look at this declaration, we fall short…

Vienna and smelling roses

On arrival in Vienna yesterday, even though The Altstadt Vienna hotel is beautiful and we are quite spoilt being able to afford to stay here, we had a few teething problems, and I had a dreadful night with little sleep. The manager of the hotel has been nothing short of brilliant in her efforts to…

‘I live in a little cloud’, by Christine Bryden

Today I wanted to honour another person who I am privileged to have met and can call my friend, who is also living positively with dementia. Christine Bryden is an amazing woman, diagnosed age 46 with dementia (she is now 63), who is still advocating publicly for people living with or caring for people with dementia. She…