Thinking for ourselves

think for yourself

This fabulous quote was on a blog I follow called Lateral Love Australia, and ‘the Co-Founder and Director, Nicola Butler, is in a joint endeavour with the head of her family, William Brian Butler, holding steadfast to the sentiments of Martin Luther King Jr. “The time is always right to do what is right”; the movement is successfully harnessing the power of Love to guide intentions and activate that strength of human spirit to challenge long held stereotypes…’

I love their ideals, and the notion of changing things through advocacy and love.

Thinking for ourselves is often difficult to do, as the desire to fit is so strong when we are young it can influence us for a lifetime. It can stop us thinking for ourselves, and I see this negatively affecting individuals, and society, every day. Thinking for oneself is a pleasure. Despite the overpowering effect of the dominant religious and political ideologies, many individuals do learn to think for themselves; and by doing so, by actively, critically thinking for themselves, rather than by submissively accepting other opinions, they reclaim their psyche as their own.

Allowing others the privilege to think for themselves, is not only liberating for them, but for us too. When we first start dating someone, we usually love and accept each others differences, and then as the relationship evolves, it seems we often start to want the person to think and be more like us! It is too easy to be defensive or personally offended when someone actively thinks for themselves and disagrees with us, and yet, usually this is exactly what we want for ourselves. Unconditional love is definitely the way…

There are tomes of philosophical works by ideologists, nihilists, moralists, and so on… on thinking for oneself, self actualisation, authentic conscious raising… the works of which I cannot compete! There are many who (subconsciously) choose not to think for themselves, and who often think they cannot achieve their own life’s desires,  and then end up fighting for someone else’s goal or cause. If we don’t think for ourselves, we are easily brainwashed or coerced. Politicians rely on this!

We are not a particularly think-for-yourself culture. From an early age, most of us are taught what we should do; to simply accept convention and follow it. And although we may rail against it at times, we usually act with complicity, allowing others to make decisions for us, because if we don’t we get into trouble – by parents, teachers, employers, team managers, and so on. We become passive participants in our own lives, uninformed in the language of self, and dis-empowered when it comes to our ability to make choices for ourselves, which can also affects the world around us.

As the symptoms of dementia progress, we [PWD] are less able to express ourselves, and ultimately less able to think for ourselves. This affects our sense of identity, and our relationships, and our ability to function. We are then at the mercy of others, and all we can do it hope they will act in our best interest, and provide care for us that is honourable and dignified. It is a lottery ticket, the result of which will impact us greatly! This is when we become submissive participants in our own lives, unable to make our own choices, and reliant on the actions of others. It is one very daunting thought…

2 thoughts on “Thinking for ourselves

  1. This blog reminds me that pharmacological intervention has a bad habit of removing the living breathing persona of a PWD.

The only thing missing in this global conversation is YOUR voice... Thank you.

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