Between the Pages: Concussions in Football Players

Thanks Jami, for bringing this very important issue to my attention, which I am sharing with my blog readers and friends, especially those of children paying any tackle sport. The stats re numbers, i.e. professional vs children, was indeed staggering. My youngest son still plays football, and has had a number of concussions, mild and worse, but do you think I can get him to consider the risk… of course not! I have to remain a fatalist, and hold onto the line I use so often, ‘we live until we die’, and it is up to as as adults to make those choices. But perhaps we have to be far more discerning when it comes to our children. Where I live, sport is such an integral part of life, and to not play sport in Australia especially as a child can almost mean no friends, the pressure to participate, regardless of the risk is very high. Anyway, enough rambling from me, thanks for sharing this one.

Exploring Dementia

Those who read this site on a regular basis know that one of my pet subjects is that of concussions in our young people who play football.  Well, today I came across an article in “Bloomberg Business” which further proves to suggest that exposing our children to full-contact football at an early age might not be in their best interests.

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10 thoughts on “Between the Pages: Concussions in Football Players

  1. The other day I had my second visit with my geriatrician. I reported that I have noticed new memory gaps, unusual for me behaviours etc. I wrote about it on my blog. One of my followers suggested I may have had “too many bonks on the head.” It’s surely a possibility.

    Last year (at age 58) I took up curling and have since fallen twice; I hit my head head hard on the ice on both occasions. The first time (about a year ago), I was taken to the hospital by ambulance. I’ve always been sporty and have had quite a few “bonks,” and so I will soon be getting an “Ice Halo” which is a piece of protective head gear designed specifically for curling. Too little to late perhaps but better safe than sorry to be super cliched about it!

  2. Hi Kate, thank you for sharing this article and information. If I may share my thoughts..I think part of this issue is the question of ‘what we know now’. Also the ‘invincibility of youth’. When my son played rugby 20 years ago, there wasn’t the evidence of harm, and I didnt know the potential risks. My son did sustain damage, which was not evident at the time, and it has altered his life. I couldnt dissuade him from playing, it was a team sport and he loved being a part of the team. I have just watched the USA Super Bowl on TV today…and it was spectacular, what is very noticeable is the protective gear worn by grid iron players. I wonder what the head injury rate and sequaelae is in the USA. I am wondering what other sport options are available to your son? I don’t know his age..but Beach Volleyball is taking off in South Australia. That is an awesome team sport, which requires a very high level of fitness. You are right, loads of sport choices in our country. I think you raise two most important points..the importance of Brain Health..and what we know now..the question is ..how is Brain Health brought to every Australian man woman and child’s consciousness? A whole other issue and a National priority. keep well ..regards, Patricia Mitchell

    • Thanks for your thoughts and ideas Patricia… I’ve tried other sport options/suggestion, but it seems, the ‘Aussie rules’ culture is too strong! Unfortunately, the local football clubs here do NOT adhere to the concussion guidelines now being followed by the AFL, which perhaps is something that needs some campaigning on?

      • Are you saying the Aussie Rules Clubs in SA are not complying with the concussion guidelines? Now that is a problem, not right and not fair. I see patients in my clinic, who were professional footballers and aged in their late 50’s early 60’s and they have significant cognitive damage. It is a leap to suggest it was from football but the evidence is surely growing. Admire your advocacy..

      • Age a Factor in Sports-Related Brain Injuries

        Football players who started young are more likely to develop memory problems later in life.
        Read More >

        from The Doctor Weekly Health (Dear Kate sending on this..hope you can find it and also find it useful.)
        Patricia

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