Living a good life with dementia: It is possible

As we move through Brain Health Awareness Month, one of the things so often missing for people who are newly diagnosed, and their families, is HOPE. Hence, I’m also sharing stories of hope this month.

The article below is a great read, and whilst I’m not a fan of the term ‘Living well with dementia’ and much prefer Living Beyond Dementia, I do know it’s possible to live a better life than we are told to expect when first and most often, also long after being diagnosed.

When we advance to late stage dementia, or cancer, or MND, or life, it’s not always much fun and almost always involves significant suffering. But as I wrote many years ago, why live like that now.

With no cures on the horizon for any type of dementia, it seems for now, the very best we can do is to manage our health well, and this definitely icldues brain health strategies such as diet and exercise. Perhaps we should be doing that for almost ALL health conditions anyway, rather than rely on the pharmaceutical industry for their often expensive, and what are usually very toxic quick fixes anyway? Just a thought…

Living Well, Even With Alzheimer’s

Many people have the idea that Alzheimer’s disease is a one-way street to inexorable decline, but patients can remain active and engaged.

By Gayatri Devi Nov. 3, 2017 9:46 a.m. ETSeven years ago, Joe, a 73-year-old man with a patrician bearing, came to see me at my Manhattan office with his stylish wife and their grown daughter. (I’ve changed his name to protect his privacy.) 

Seven years ago, Joe, a 73-year-old man with a patrician bearing, came to see me at my Manhattan office with his stylish wife and their grown daughter. (I’ve changed his name to protect his privacy.) A money manager in charge of more than a billion dollars in assets, Joe could tell that his memory was fading. Transactions that were once easy for him had started to cause him trouble. 

“I was born with an extremely good brain, and I’ve utilized it very well,” Joe said. “But in the last couple of years or so, I’ve been forgetting. I watch a movie and lose the thread of it. I drive right past my destination. I used to have a fantastic vocabulary, and now I search for words. I think my brain cells are dying.”

Attesting to his eloquence, Joe summed up by saying, “I see a consistent failure in cognition.” His astute internist was concerned that Joe was developing some type of dementia. After a thorough evaluation and laboratory work-up, it turned out that his internist was right—Joe had Alzheimer’s disease. 

Many people have the idea that Alzheimer’s is a one-way street to inexorable decline. They believe that treatment is ineffective, which often discourages them from seeking a diagnosis when facing memory loss.

Read the full article here…

Ps. I first posted this on my Living Beyond Dementia blog in 2019…

One thought on “Living a good life with dementia: It is possible

You are very welcome to respectfully join this global conversation.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.